Where to find the prettiest blooms in Singapore

Oleander (Nerium oleander) and varieties of bougainvillea.
Oleander (Nerium oleander) and varieties of bougainvillea.PHOTO: ANDREW TAU, NATIONAL PARKS BOARD
Trumpet Tree (Tabebuia rosea) at Central Expressway near Cambridge Road and the Moulmein Road exit.
Trumpet Tree (Tabebuia rosea) at Central Expressway near Cambridge Road and the Moulmein Road exit.PHOTO: CHAN CHUN LEONG, NATIONAL PARKS BOARD
Handkerchief Tree (Maniltoa browneoides) at University Road off Dunearn Road.
Handkerchief Tree (Maniltoa browneoides) at University Road off Dunearn Road.PHOTO: ANDREW TAU, NATIONAL PARKS BOARD
Crepe Myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica) along the centre divider of East Coast Parkway.
Crepe Myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica) along the centre divider of East Coast Parkway.PHOTO: DAMIEN QIU, NATIONAL PARKS BOARD

Recent rain showers have led to the flowering of some roadside plants around Singapore

The Garden City is in full bloom from now until next month and it has the recent rain showers to thank for that.

Mr Oh Cheow Sheng, National Parks Board's group director of streetscape, says the wet weather has "contributed to the flowering of these plants".

Singapore has more than 2,000 native species and the previous flowering season, also because of a wet spell, was earlier this year in March and April. Although the next two weeks are reported to be drier and warmer than last month, some thundery showers are still expected.

Nature photographers are advised to grab the earliest opportunity to snap these blooms as heavy rains can shorten the blooming season.

Mr Oh shares where to find the flowers.


Oleander (Nerium oleander) and varieties of bougainvillea

What: Oleanders are small green shrubs with pretty purple flowers while bougainvilleas come in a wider range of colours such as white, yellow-orange, purple and pink.

Where: Bougainvilleas are commonly found around the island, especially on overhead bridges.

A fun way to see both flowers would be to rent a bicycle with friends and family and ride around East Coast Park.


Trumpet Tree (Tabebuia rosea)

What: As its name suggests, each bloom comprises a cluster of small trumpet- shaped flowers that range in colour from mauve to white.

Where: Along the Ayer Rajah Expressway near Hong Leong Garden; or Central Expressway near Cambridge Road and the Moulmein Road exit


Handkerchief Tree (Maniltoa browneoides)

What: Its blooms are hard to miss - big, drooping pale-yellow flowers that resemble handkerchiefs.

Where: Yishun Avenue 2; University Road off Dunearn Road; Martin Road in River Valley; Punggol Walk; and Sengkang Square


Cat's Claw Ivy (Macfadyena unguis-cati)

What: It is a climbing vine that has yellow flowers shaped like funnels or trumpets.

Where: Along the centre divider in Havelock Road and Dunearn Road (pictured)


Crepe Myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica)

What: The flowers have a lush and dense collection of petals, have a crepe-like texture and come in a variety of colours such as white, pink and purple.

Where: Along the centre divider of East Coast Parkway

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on August 06, 2016, with the headline 'City in bloom'. Print Edition | Subscribe