Will there be fireworks at the Golden Globes?

The 2018 Globes will be draped in black, quite literally, with actresses and some actors vowing to use their attire to make a statement about sexual harassment.
The 2018 Globes will be draped in black, quite literally, with actresses and some actors vowing to use their attire to make a statement about sexual harassment. PHOTO: AFP

LOS ANGELES (NYTimes) - In search of ratings, NBC has long promoted the Golden Globe Awards as less of a ceremony and more of a silly social gathering.

The 75th instalment (Monday morning, Singapore time) has been advertised as "Hollywood's party of the year". Viewers may be very disappointed.

The 2018 Globes will be draped in black, quite literally, with actresses and some actors vowing to use their attire to make a statement about sexual harassment.

Winners are expected to use their moments of glory to rail against the systemic sexism and silence that allowed the behaviour of men like Harvey Weinstein, James Toback, Louis C.K. and Kevin Spacey to fester for decades.

Other topics discussed on the red carpet and from the stage inside the Beverly Hilton's International Ballroom may include racism (several films up for awards, including Get Out, wrestle with that subject) and President Donald Trump and his policies.

The Post, Steven Spielberg's newspaper drama, functions as a condemnation of the Trump administration's attacks on journalists. It has six Globe nominations, including one for Meryl Streep, who criticised Mr Trump from the Globe stage last year.

If anything, this year's Globes will serve as a test for the Oscars on March 4. Can Hollywood castigate itself and celebrate itself at the same time? And deliver a telecast and red carpet extravaganza that keep the ratings from tumbling?

 

NBC and the givers of the Globes, the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, a group of 89 journalists, have been trying to assure viewers that the night will be as frothy as ever.

It could all add up to a moment when the Golden Globes finally grows up, becoming an event with equal parts solemnness and spectacle.

Here are five things to watch for this morning.

1. Harvey Weinstein is on many minds.

"It's nice to have an elephant in the room," Seth Meyers, who will host the ceremony, told The New York Times about the topic of sexual harassment. "There's nothing more helpful than something everybody's thinking about."

But will Meyers call out Weinstein by name in his monologue?

2. Oh, right. The awards.

The Oscar race has been unusually chaotic this time around. For various reasons - Hollywood's attention has been elsewhere, the plethora of strong choices in some categories and few in others - consensus has yet to form. So the Globes could bring some clarity.

One nail-biter is best drama. The Post could easily win. But so could Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.

3. A lift before the Oscars.

In truth, the Globes are often predictive of little. Top honours at the Oscars and the Globes matched up only once over the past three years. But the trophies are coveted by studios, which hope to get a box office blast of attention for winter movies.

4. It's Oprah's turn.

Oprah Winfrey is set to receive the Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievement. Will Winfrey deliver a political zinger of her own? If she does, it will probably be against the entertainment industry.

She has been involved in recent months with the creation of an ambitious anti-harassment action plan called Time's Up.

5. Television has big stars, too.

While the movie awards receive the most attention because of their proximity to the Oscars race, the Globes ceremony relies on television categories for much of its star power.

Making trips to the stage could be Nicole Kidman, nominated for best actress in a limited series or made-for-TV movie (the now-continuing Big Little Lies) and Eric McCormack (Will & Grace), a favourite for best actor in a comedy.