Sony Pictures considered Tom Cruise for the role of Steve Jobs, hacked documents reveal

US actor Tom Cruise taking a break from filming for  Mission Impossible 5 on Sept 25, 2014,  near the Moroccan capital Rabat. hacked documents revealed that he had once been considered to play late Apple boss Steve Jobs. -- PHOTO: AFP
US actor Tom Cruise taking a break from filming for  Mission Impossible 5 on Sept 25, 2014,  near the Moroccan capital Rabat. hacked documents revealed that he had once been considered to play late Apple boss Steve Jobs. -- PHOTO: AFP

NEW YORK - Sony Pictures at one time considered Tom Cruise for the role of Apple founder Steve Jobs for its biopic project that it eventually gave up, it was reported.

But that idea fizzled out, according to the latest documents released online on Monday by hackers following the recent computer attack on California-based Sony.

E-mails belonging to Sony Pictures Entertainment co-chairman Amy Pascal were released, which reveals how financial constraints led the Sony studio to give up on the project, which was taken over by Universal Pictures.

The choice of the actor to play Mr Jobs, which was passed from Leonardo DiCaprio to Christian Bale and then to Michael Fassbender, also contributed to the collapse of the project.

According to an e-mail, Aaron Sorkin, a co-writer on the project, had last October pushed for Cruise to play Jobs.

But Danny Boyle, who signed to direct the film, was concerned about the age of Cruise, who is 52.

Sorkin wrote that Boyle thought casting Cruise would be " met with derision because it's such a commercial choice".

Sony also expressed concern about the cost of the project and its ability to find financial partners, reported Bloomberg.

"I think Danny needs to rethink how he wants to do the movie," Ms Pascal told producer Scott Rudin on Nov 13, referring to Boyle. "We are not gonna get anyone to help us out here at this cost with this cast."

She tells Rudin she wants to "slow this down", as reported by Bloomberg.

He replies: "If we slow it down, I think Danny walks."

By then, sources of co-financing for the production have passed, Mr Doug Belgrad, president of Sony Pictures' motion picture group, tells Ms Pascal.

On Nov 21, Universal Pictures picked up the Jobs film.

"What happened is entirely my fault,"Ms  Pascal said in an e-mail that day to Mr Rudin. "I have made other kinds of mistakes, but not like this."

Sony Pictures said its computers were hacked on Nov 25.

Since then, the hackers had been releasing online access to unreleased films as well as private information such as data on Hollywood stars, and now are dumping executive e-mails online.

A senior FBI official on Tuesday said the agency has not confirmed widely held suspicions that the culprit was North Korea, which had objected to the Seth Rogen film The Interview, about a plot to kill North Korean leader Kim Jong Un that is due for release on Dec 25.