Kidman: Hollywood is of a bygone era

(From far left) US actress Rooney Mara, British actor Dev Patel, Australian actress Nicole Kidman and Australian director Garth Davis at the screening of Lion during the 41st annual Toronto International Film Festival last Saturday.
(From far left) US actress Rooney Mara, British actor Dev Patel, Australian actress Nicole Kidman and Australian director Garth Davis at the screening of Lion during the 41st annual Toronto International Film Festival last Saturday.PHOTO: EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY

TORONTO • Australian star Nicole Kidman warned on Sunday that Hollywood is facing new challenges in the era of online streaming and needs festivals more than ever to get films noticed.

"I don't think there is a Hollywood anymore," she told a press conference in Toronto following the world premiere of Lion by director Garth Davis. "We're all scattered around the world and we make films all around the world and Hollywood is of some bygone era now, which is sad in a way," she said.

"I think film festivals are so important now because it's very hard for films to be discovered. We need all the help we can get for smaller films and films that are not big studio films or superhero films."

In Weinstein Company's Lion, Kidman, 49, plays a real-life Australian mother, who adopts a five- year-old street kid from Calcutta. She herself is an adoptive mother of two with ex-husband Tom Cruise.

Lion, adapted from Saroo Brierley's memoir A Long Way Home, also stars Slumdog Millionaire's Dev Patel as an adult Saroo setting out to find his lost family in India, as well as Rooney Mara, 31.

"I rocked up here with Slumdog in my school shoes and a borrowed suit and it's good to be back here with a bit of facial hair with this (film)," Patel, 26, said. Slumdog won the Toronto film festival audience prize for Best Picture before sweeping eight Oscars.

AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on September 13, 2016, with the headline 'Kidman: Hollywood is of a bygone era'. Print Edition | Subscribe