Emma Stone and Andrew Garfield: No selfies and no relationship questions, please

Attending the promotional event of The Amazing Spider-Man 2 in Singapore were (from left) cast members Jamie Foxx, Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone, director Marc Webb and producers Avi Arad and Matt Tolmach. -- PHOTO: THE NEW PAPER FILE
Attending the promotional event of The Amazing Spider-Man 2 in Singapore were (from left) cast members Jamie Foxx, Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone, director Marc Webb and producers Avi Arad and Matt Tolmach. -- PHOTO: THE NEW PAPER FILE

During the visit of The Amazing Spider-Man 2 cast in Singapore, Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone gave photographers no opportunity to see them for the couple they were in real life - there was nary a public display of affection, much less canoodling.

Garfield himself will not comment on it and any attempt at mentioning it to him will draw his ire, as a reporter in London recently discovered when she was told his personal life "was not public property".

As if to preempt any attempt at penetrating the curtain he has drawn on his relationship with co-star Stone, the actor, 30, tells the press at a small-group interview at the Marina Bay Sands hotel earlier last month that in the past, "actors could be actors".

The lounge area where the interviews are being held has been commandeered by a small army of studio personnel armed with clipboards and stern demeanours.

They warn the press against taking selfies with the stars (a rule that is flouted with some regularity outside of Los Angeles, especially by newbie reporters) and look like the types that will summarily eject any reporter who makes things awkward for Garfield.

With the same earnest intensity that would not be out of place coming from his character Peter Parker, he rather ominously tells journalists soon after he arrives that "there is a new thing where even if you are just an actor and don't have any intention of being anything else, your privacy is lost, because of this social media age".

Even director Marc Webb seems to have sworn an oath of secrecy over the Garfield-Stone relationship, one of Hollywood's worst-kept secrets.

He is asked if there might be logistical problems if, two movies down and with several more in the franchise in the pipeline, his co-stars split up.

Webb, 39, with a look of mock seriousness, says: "I can't comment on that." There is nervous laughter from the other journalists.

"They are consummate professionals and it is a joy to work with them," he continues.

In any case, Stone's character of Gwen Stacy is not long for this world. In the comic-book series, she dies. Parker's affections shift to Mary Jane Watson, an event that will occur in the film series before long.

Stone, 25, having earned a reputation as one of Hollywood's most talented comedic actresses, will not have any problems landing another gig. She comes in for her 10 minutes with the press with a takeaway cup of coffee in hand, declaring her love of caffeine.

She has the journalists completely charmed within seconds with an explanation of why she missed a cast visit to Commonwealth Secondary School that morning.

"It takes me like 16 hours to get ready. I suck," she says, glumly.

And predictably, as soon as her 15 minutes are up, one of the regional journalists leaps up to ask for a selfie with her. She sweetly turns him down and he returns to his chair, looking sheepish.

If she had not said no, it is likely that one of her minders would have dived in to block the shot in a much less charming manner.

Jamie Foxx, 46, playing the villain Electro in the movie, is the final interview for our group and, like Stone, cannot resist a joke at his own expense.

He talks about how, on this particular press junket, he and his family have been to Beijing and Kuala Lumpur.

"We design our vacations around whatever movie I'm in. We get free hotel rooms, know what I'm saying?" he quips.

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