Being the strong woman

Carrie-Anne Moss (above) is a cop in The Bye Bye Man who refuses to believe that a bogeyman is killing college students Lucien Laviscount, Douglas Smith, and Cressida Bonas.
Carrie-Anne Moss (above) is a cop in The Bye Bye Man who refuses to believe that a bogeyman is killing college students Lucien Laviscount, Douglas Smith, and Cressida Bonas.PHOTO: GOLDEN VILLAGE

Carrie-Anne Moss flying-kicked her way into global attention in The Matrix trilogy of films (1999 to 2003).

But along with the skin-tight catsuit worn by the hacker Trinity, her character in that series, the 49-year-old has dropped roles that required her to run up walls or send villains flying with a single punch.

Now that she is taking on dramatic roles, she does not miss that period in her life when she was a global action star.

"I'm grateful for that time and remember it in a positive way, but I don't wish for it," she tells The Straits Times in a telephone interview.

Moss, who stars in the horror movie The Bye Bye Man, which opens in cinemas tomorrow, thinks of her time in The Matrix as "a great experience" but says that she is in a different phase of her life and career now.

When I was doing The Matrix, I was single and didn't have any kids. As lovely as that was, it was kind of lonely.

ACTRESS CARRIE-ANNE MOSS, who is now a mother of two sons and a daughter

"Since then, I've had children and family, it's a whole different energy. When I was doing The Matrix, I was single and didn't have any kids. As lovely as that was, it was kind of lonely," says Moss.

"When I go away to act, it's wonderful but it's not my whole life."

Being a mother has helped her develop as an actress because "it brings nuances to your acting when you have this rich, full life", adds Moss, who has two sons, 13 and 11, and a daughter, seven, with actor Steven Roy.

The characters she has played since The Matrix share traits with Trinity - like her, they tend to be tough women holding their own in a world dominated by superheroes and supervillains.

In The Bye Bye Man, she has the supporting role of Detective Shaw, who refuses to believe that a supernatural bogeyman is killing college students; in the science-fiction television series Humans, she is Dr Morrow, a scientist cutting into sentient robots to learn their secrets.

The Canada-born actress does not have a ready answer for why she gets cast in iron lady parts, but guesses that producers and directors have preconceived notions.

"I like to play strong women... I've worked for a long time and have a body of work, and people tend to see you in a certain way and I probably come to mind when they think of who can play a strong woman," she says.

Among them would be Jeri Hogarth, the lawyer she plays on the Marvel superhero television shows Jessica Jones, Daredevil and The Defenders.

She is a guest star everywhere, but is not a main cast member anywhere. In spite of this, she is working flat out, she says.

"I'm not sure I could work more. With acting, it depends on schedules and I've been pretty busy," she says. She slowed down 13 years ago when her children were younger, but from about 2013, it has been full steam ahead.

"I'm super grateful because I get to balance acting with being a parent."

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on January 11, 2017, with the headline 'Being the strong woman'. Print Edition | Subscribe