Bee Gees were never sure they could come up with hit after hit, says Barry Gibb

Singer Barry Gibb performing during the taping of the Stayin' Alive: A Grammy Salute to the Music of the Bee Gees, on Feb 14, 2017.
Singer Barry Gibb performing during the taping of the Stayin' Alive: A Grammy Salute to the Music of the Bee Gees, on Feb 14, 2017. PHOTO: REUTERS

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - The Bee Gees are among the best-selling artists of all time but according to Barry Gibb, the last remaining member of the pop group, they never saw themselves as a success.

"I have an inferiority complex and so did my brothers," he said in a recent interview with Reuters, "so we never really knew whether we'd made it or not.

"And every time we had a hit, there was always another record that wasn't a hit, so we got used to that.

"It was always, 'Well, okay, back to the studio and let's try again'."

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This year marks the 40th anniversary of the release of disco film Saturday Night Fever, for which he and his brothers provided the soundtrack which catapulted them to fame.

The soundtrack took the Grammy for Album of the Year in 1979.

Timeless: The All-Time Greatest Hits, a career-spanning collection of top hits by the trio, was released last month.

The album features 21 tracks selected by Gibb, and sequenced in chronological order from the start of their career.