The Art Collections Of Japanese And Singaporean Private Collectors

The Art Collections Of Japanese And Singaporean Private Collectors exhibition is a celebration of 50 years of diplomatic relations between Japan and Singapore. Hosted by Warehouse Terrada, in cooperation with Helu-Trans, it features the works of Singapore artists - picked from the collections of Japanese collectors - and Japanese works from Singapore collectors, in a spectrum of mediums and styles, from the quirky to the brooding.

INFINITE SET 38 (2015)

By Tomomi Nitta

Oil, crystal powder on canvas, 183x122cm

In her Infinite Set series, the artist uses female forms, floating in an empty space, to express a world of rich emotion and imagination, where identity is an uncertain - even unneeded - concept.

VAGINAL FLOWERS (1996)

By Nobuyoshi Araki

Gelatin silver print, 60x60cm

The artist - among Japan's best-known photographers and its most controversial cultural export - takes shots of flowers as erotic objects, finding new meaning and perspectives in everyday life.

SEA STATE 5 - DRIFT (STAY STILL NOW TO MOVE) (2012)

By Charles Lim

  • WHERE: Lewin Terrace, 21 Lewin Terrace

    MRT: City Hall

    WHEN: Jan 19 to 23, noon to 3pm and 5 to 9pm. Closed on Jan 21 from 5 to 9pm for a private event.

    ADMISSION: Free

Video installation, single channel digital video output

The artist, a former Olympic sailor, has for years been creating images of Singapore's seas for his Sea State series.

OF COURSE, I CAN'T ADMIT WHAT I REALLY MEANT (2014)

By Tomona Matsukawa

Oil on panel, 90x130cm

The artist puts the focus on absent females in her work - putting front and centre their belongings and bodies, and hiding their faces from sight. Here, it is scratches on skin - a hint at damage and moral ambiguity in a woman's world.

ROCK IN JAPAN (2002)

By Yoshitomo Nara

Pencil, crayon, acrylic on paper, 40x30cm

This two-sided painting of figures that call to mind toddlers or infant animals seems deceptively simple. But the artist subverts these cute images by infusing his work with horror-like imagery, juxtaposing human evil with childhood innocence.

THE BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY (2006)

Directed by Ho Tzu Nyen

Single channel digital video

The film, set in Singapore's Supreme Court, takes its dialogue entirely from the lyrics of the Queen song, where a boy is on trial. It explores how media is made by documenting its own production and presenting itself with a film-within-film quality.

FRAMING CAMELLIA (2014)

By Hilmi Johandi

Video installation

With this piece, the artist turns his gaze to Singapore in the 1950s and 1960s, assembling images from film, archival footage and photographs into a fragmented montage that hints at the social effects of rapid development, and the personal desires and despair of those who attempt to embrace modernisation.

Nur Asyiqin Mohamad Salleh

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on January 15, 2016, with the headline 'HourAtTheMuseum'. Print Edition | Subscribe