See sculptures tumble

The Conversation by Samantha Chua features small, kinetic sculptures, such as the one on the left, which tumble on the ground when they sense movement.
The Conversation by Samantha Chua features small, kinetic sculptures, such as the one on the left, which tumble on the ground when they sense movement.PHOTO: BETWIXT FESTIVAL

The relationship between man and technology lies at the heart of the Betwixt Festival art exhibition.

Of the 10 works in the show, six were picked from an open call which drew 170 submissions from around the world.

There is also a work by Austrian artist Lia, an early pioneer of software and Net art, as well as three works by students from Ping Yi Secondary School, who participated in an earlier digital interactive art workshop organised by art collective Spang & Lei, which is behind Betwixt.

Among the works selected from the open call is Memory Repository by creative technologist Benjamin Low, 37, and software engineer Mithru Vigneshwara, 23.

Their work looks at how people can share and experience personal memories intimately in the public realm.

It takes the form of a plinth with peep holes through which the audience can view a stream of tweets contributed by the public on their memories.

  • VIEW IT / BETWIXT FESTIVAL EXHIBITION

  • WHERE: ArtScience Museum, Marina Bay Sands and Sunshine Plaza, 91 Bencoolen Street

    WHEN: Friday to Sunday, 10am to 7pm

    ADMISSION: Free

The viewer can also contribute his memory to the stream by tweeting with the designated hashtag.

Another work, The Conversation, by School of the Arts student Samantha Chua, 17, features small, kinetic sculptures programmed to tumble on the ground when they sense movement in their surroundings. A site-specific installation, it is located near an entrance to Sunshine Plaza in Bencoolen Street.

The work, Chua says, is inspired by the space. She was chatting with a friend as she walked through the entrance one day when she noticed her voice reverberating in the space because of the architecture of the entrance.

She says: "It is a transitory space, so perhaps people don't stop to notice and have fun with it.

"I wanted to draw attention to the quality of the space and make people linger by introducing art."

Huang Lijie

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on February 23, 2016, with the headline 'See sculptures tumble'. Print Edition | Subscribe