Around the world with nanoblock

Spot Singapore’s Merlion in brick form (above) and look out for the nanoGauge train – modelled after Japan’s most famous train, the shinkansen bullet train, as it moves around a railway track.
Spot Singapore’s Merlion in brick form (above) and look out for the nanoGauge train – modelled after Japan’s most famous train, the shinkansen bullet train, as it moves around a railway track.ST PHOTO: JONATHAN CHOO, TEXT: GURVEEN KAUR
 Spot Singapore's Merlion in brick form and look out for the nanoGauge train (above) - modelled after Japan's most famous train, the shinkansen bullet train, as it moves around a railway track. Some 80,000 to 100,000 of the micro-sized building blocks wer
Spot Singapore's Merlion in brick form and look out for the nanoGauge train (above) - modelled after Japan's most famous train, the shinkansen bullet train, as it moves around a railway track. Some 80,000 to 100,000 of the micro-sized building blocks were used in total.ST PHOTO: JONATHAN CHOO, TEXT: GURVEEN KAUR

Fans of nanoblock, there is a little piece of heaven waiting for you at Changi Airport's Terminal 3. A nanoblock museum has popped up on Level B2 opposite Kopitiam food court and there are 249 designs on display. They are divided into six zones - dinosaurs, musical instruments, wonders of the world, outer space, wilderness and Japan. Spot Singapore's Merlion in brick form and look out for the nanoGauge train - modelled after Japan's most famous train, the shinkansen bullet train, as it moves around a railway track. Some 80,000 to 100,000 of the micro-sized building blocks were used in total. This marks the debut of a nanoblock museum outside its birthplace of Japan and the pop-up will run till May 1. It is open from 11am to 10pm daily.

See more photos of the nanoblock museum here.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on March 13, 2017, with the headline 'Around the world with nanoblock'. Print Edition | Subscribe