Neon Lights 2016

Alien siblings to unite 'humansexuals'

Two-time National Poetry Slam champion Shivram Gopinath will discuss the absurdities of Singapore life. Punk collective The Scene Kids will be performing on Nov 26 and 27. London's neo-cabaret duo Bourgeois & Maurice are purportedly an alien sibling
Two-time National Poetry Slam champion Shivram Gopinath will discuss the absurdities of Singapore life. Punk collective The Scene Kids will be performing on Nov 26 and 27. London's neo-cabaret duo Bourgeois & Maurice are purportedly an alien sibling pair who spend their time writing tunes about Earth events.PHOTOS: NEON LIGHTS

British neo-cabaret duo Bourgeois & Maurice have an otherworldly backstory.

They are brother and sister from another dimension who accidentally killed the people identified as their parents during a freak storm while trying to install satellite TV.

Georgeois Bourgeois (played by George Heyworth) and his sister Maurice Maurice (played by Liv Morris) now spend their time writing tunes on the uglier happenings on Earth .

The outlandish pair will be bringing their zany yet acerbic brand of entertainment to Asia for the first time at Neon Lights' Club Minky stage on both days of the festival: 8.45pm on Nov 26 and 8pm on Nov 27.

"There is a non-human quality about Bourgeois & Maurice and based on that position as an alien or outsider, we write songs about cultural happenings in the world," Morris, 34, tells The Straits Times in a telephone interview from London, where the pair is based.

With an absurdly tall beehive perched on top of her head, her character is the mellower of the two, deadpan as she plays the keyboard or trombone and harmonises with her brother.

On the opposite end is Bourgeois, the narcissistic frontman with ridiculously full eyelashes.

Their loud and glittery costumes belie their sharp, astute lyrics digging into topical issues including the effects of Fomo (fear of missing out) and the hypocrisy of the various forms of racial or sexual discrimination.

Since forming in 2007, they have released three albums with a fourth on the way and have performed across Europe as well as in New York and Australia.

Heyworth, 33, says they do not go out of their way to offend sensibilities: "We're more interested in the shared strangeness of humans than 'othering' people.

"The message in our shows is about finding something that unites us as humansexuals," he says, using a gender neutral term for addressing the audience.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on November 18, 2016, with the headline 'Alien siblings to unite 'humansexuals''. Print Edition | Subscribe