Voices Of Youth

Useful to have some legal knowledge

Young people are at a stage of finding themselves - experimenting with new things and struggling to fit in and be accepted - which makes them vulnerable.

They may be misled to do things that are wrong, such as taking drugs or bullying a classmate. Or others may take advantage of their vulnerability and get them into trouble.

Students who are aware of unlawful behaviour by someone they know may hesitate to report it, especially if the person is a close friend or loved one. They may be scared that it would strain the relationship.

Having knowledge of offences, crime prevention and their rights prepares students for such situations and encourages them to speak up (Project helps students understand the law; July 3).

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Perhaps lessons can be crafted to teach students what to do, such as how to reject someone with a questionable offer in a firm manner, or how to persuade a person to end his unlawful behaviour.

Most importantly, students must know that if they need help, there will always be someone they can turn to.

Jacintha Wee Yun Yi, 16, Secondary 4 student