Upskirt offences: Culprits need counselling too

District Judge Kenneth Yap correctly pointed out that there have been far too many upskirt video cases and there is a need for stiffer sentences (Ex-bank officer jailed for upskirt videos; Sept 29).

But we should not just fine or jail those who do not respect a woman's modesty.

There are underlying issues that need to be addressed.

From the cases reported, there appears to be a link between stress and voyeurism.

Those caught include engineers, bank officers, salesmen and students who seem unable to cope with the demands of daily life, are lonely or are just plain bored.

They may see taking upskirt videos as a form of escapism and a cheap thrill.

However, once caught, they pay a heavy price for their offence.

Those who are convicted are bound to lose their jobs, and both they and their loved ones can easily slip into depression from the negative publicity.

They will also be shunned by friends and former colleagues.

So, let's not just punish the sinner, but condemn the sin as well.

To this end, it is vital that voyeurs get mandatory treatment that includes counselling to rid them of their obsession, with support groups helping them along the way.

Raymond Anthony Fernando

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on October 03, 2017, with the headline 'Upskirt offences: Culprits need counselling too'. Print Edition | Subscribe