Problems with allowing small animals on buses

There will be the question of what defines a "small" animal. For example, a chihuahua may also be considered small, so should it be allowed on public transport?
There will be the question of what defines a "small" animal. For example, a chihuahua may also be considered small, so should it be allowed on public transport?PHOTO: ST FILE

Allowing small animals like birds and hamsters on buses will open a Pandora's box ("Allow pet owners to take small animals on buses" by Mr Ng Aik Sing; Dec 16).

Owners of other pets, such as dogs, could then demand such rights, too.

There will be the question of what defines a "small" animal. For example, a chihuahua may also be considered small, so should it be allowed on public transport?

Some people are afraid of animals, regardless of the size. Others could be sensitive to animals because of health or religious issues. There is no guarantee that small pets are better behaved than other animals.

Then, there are social considerations.

Some people are afraid of animals, regardless of the size. Others could be sensitive to animals because of health or religious issues.

There is no guarantee that small pets are better behaved than other animals, especially in a shared environment on public transport.

The animals may make a lot of noise and irritate commuters. There could also be problems if they are accidentally let loose.

Guide dogs are needed to assist visually handicapped commuters, but other animals are just pets.

Public transport is meant for people, not animals, and we should keep it that way.

Francis Cheng

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on December 19, 2016, with the headline 'Problems with allowing small animals on buses'. Print Edition | Subscribe