Ports are dangerous places for public

Ports and shipyards are dangerous workplaces, with massive vehicles constantly moving about carrying heavy equipment and loads.

I used to work in a port as well as in a shipyard, and I am familiar with the operations and activities in these places. I cannot agree more with Ms Wee Kwee Keng (Tuas port's focus should be on port-related work; April 5).

Heavy equipment such as gantry quay cranes, and industrial activities involving welding and noxious gases would be serious safety concerns.

People who do not have official business at a port or shipyard are not encouraged to visit, and outsiders are definitely not welcome for safety reasons.

It is why I, too, find it incongruous that retail, leisure and public spaces have been included in the Tuas port project.

I, too, find it incongruous that retail, leisure and public spaces have been included in the Tuas port project.

There is a high cost involved in relocating the ports and shipyards, which have been operating in their current premises for many years.

The Tuas port project should maximise the synergies of locating all of these in the same place, as was done for Jurong Island, if it is to reap the full economic benefits.

The only concession I would make is to have food and beverage outlets (foodcourts and coffee shops), and amenities such as ATMs and convenience stores, so that people who work there do not need to venture far for a meal or such necessities.

Lynne Tan Sok Hiang (Ms)

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on April 07, 2017, with the headline 'Ports are dangerous places for public'. Print Edition | Subscribe