On Facebook: How effective is public shaming in deterring bad behaviour?

How effective is public shaming in deterring bad behaviour?

I disagree with some of the words used to describe the man who did not give up his seat, but I support the public shaming. If one conducts oneself with proper respect and decency, not only to oneself but also to others, there is nothing to be afraid of.

Kelvin Foong

Public shaming is wrong on so many levels because there are always two sides to a story. Giving up a reserved seat should be done in utmost sincerity, not because you're afraid to be "Stomp-ed".

Nurul Nabila Bte Azman


How can prepayment schemes be made less risky for customers?

Prepayments and deposits are essentially taking deposits from the public... There should be clear regulations for such activities, and all businesses doing so should comply with them. Businesses should not be allowed to essentially borrow from the public, in this case, their customers, in the guise of selling packages.

Charis Mun

Use a third party, like a bank, to hold the money in trust between buyers and sellers. Monies (should be) released only upon services provided.

Jimmy Beany

It all depends on the decision of the customers, if they want to prepay for certain packages that are cheaper than individual visits. But they should understand that there is a risk of losing the money if the business shuts down.

Peter Tan

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on November 07, 2015, with the headline 'On Facebook: How effective is public shaming in deterring bad behaviour?'. Print Edition | Subscribe