Non-traditional families are different, not 'broken'

While Mr Christopher Goh Chun Kiat's dedication to family is admirable, as the daughter of a single mother, I found his description of other families as "broken" deeply problematic (Don't undermine families when championing issues; Oct 7).

That label assumes that something has failed with that family simply because of how it is structured, based on parental marital status and number of parents.

However, a family is a family when there is love. Families that fall outside the "normal" structure are not broken; they are merely different.

Contrary to Mr Goh's assertion, I would argue that it is the presence of the legal and policy distinctions between single/unmarried parents and the traditional family nucleus that imposes tremendous costs on the state and society.

The married family unit with children is granted various forms of assistance by the state, especially access to housing. Single parents, however, have many obstacles to surmount in order to have housing.

For instance, the income cap for rental housing is $1,500. This is a catch-22 situation for single parents, as they cannot increase their earnings to better support their families, for fear of losing their housing.

Discriminatory legislation and policies serve to compound existing inequalities in Singapore, and low-income single/unmarried parents and their children are hit the hardest.

My mother and I were fortunate enough to be able to move in with my grandparents after my mother divorced.

But not everyone has this kind of privilege in terms of familial resources and support.

If we wish not to undermine families, then let us support them instead of invalidating them.

Tomoe Suzuki (Miss)

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on October 13, 2017, with the headline 'Non-traditional families are different, not 'broken''. Print Edition | Subscribe