High cost to not offering mums flexi-work option

I am a working mother with a son in Primary 1.

Having to juggle family commitments and work demands, I can truly understand, empathise with and support Madam Pang Wen Sze's arguments (Flexi-work options can help ease mums back to work; Sept 16).

Do we not tacitly agree that working mothers who are not stricken with undue anxiety and guilt at the workplace are generally more motivated, effective and productive?

The principle and benefits of flexi-work arrangements for working mothers can be viewed more holistically.

More positive actions could be taken to come up with a win-win solution. Flexi-work options could also include a three-or four-day work week, so long as the work performance is adequate and nothing goes amiss.

Perhaps employers have valid concerns about the extent of disruptions and/or work schedule adjustments, additional resources needed, and the extra effort and time needed to spearhead, implement and sustain flexi-work options.

But they should consider the costs, resources and time incurred in having to interview, recruit, train and develop new staff if working mums leave their jobs. These could be substantial.

Employers should consider the costs, resources and time incurred in having to interview, recruit, train and develop new staff if working mums leave their jobs. These could be substantial.

Indeed, loyal employees should be given the flexi-work option. This could engender greater commitment by one and all.

Government agencies should set the ball rolling and the private sector will soon follow the leader.

Over the long haul, the attrition rate of working mothers can be reduced and Singapore mums will be more willing to help increase our dwindling population.

Heng Pei Shan (Madam)

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on September 26, 2017, with the headline 'High cost to not offering mums flexi-work option'. Print Edition | Subscribe