Get tough on handicapped parking abuse

The abuse of handicapped parking spaces is a common occurrence in Singapore ("Cab leaves no room for wheelchair user"; Tuesday).

This says a lot about our Singapore society.

Such matters are unlikely to improve unless the authorities take more rigorous enforcement measures to show that such abuses are unacceptable in our society.

The management of shopping malls and other buildings have no incentive to take action against such abuses other than making some nominal effort in putting up warning signs about clamping unauthorised vehicles parked in these spaces.

Some of these buildings do not even have wheel-clamping equipment.

The threat of incurring demerit points is far more effective than fines (which seldom ever occur).

So, at the end of the day, there is no body that enforces the rule.

Hence, the prevalent abuses continue in Singapore.

This is something we cannot be proud of.

I fully agree with president of the Disabled People's Association, Mr Nicholas Aw, that it is time to seriously consider legislating against these offences.

The threat of incurring demerit points is far more effective than fines (which seldom ever occur).

This is the right way to go.

Tan Sin Liang

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on January 08, 2016, with the headline 'Get tough on handicapped parking abuse'. Print Edition | Subscribe