Excerpts from readers' letters

ELITISM IS THE ISSUE, NOT RACE

It is not the race or skin colour that matters. Everything boils down to where one stands in the social economic ladder.

It is true that one prefers to mingle with people of a similar race, but this has to be ascribed to a shared closeness in culture, language and the like, with little to do with any perceived superiority of one's own race.

Lim Chee Khiam


RACISM KEPT AT BAY IN S'PORE

I am proud to think of myself as Singaporean Tamil although my identity card says " Ceylonese".

Minorities are resented and oppressed in many parts of the world, but, in Singapore, we are relatively lucky that racism has been kept at bay by the Government.

The National Pledge, Presidential Council for Minority Rights, group representation constituencies, and Maintenance of Religious Harmony Act are key contributors to that success.

S. Ratnakumar

 


UNSIGHTLY RENTAL BIKES

Yellow and orange bicycles - you see them in most parts of Singapore but not in their rightful places. They are in the middle of pavements and void decks even when bicycle racks are close by, in the middle of a grass patch, and even inside drains and canals.

If the companies of these rental bike services are unable to provide a quick recovery of their bicycles and find a solution to this problem, they should not be allowed to continue the service.

Nancy Quek (Ms)

SINGLISH NOT A CAUSE FOR WORRY

Many Singaporeans can switch easily from Singlish to proper English. They improve as they progress up the education ladder. It is impossible not to pick up Singlish if you are a Singaporean living in Singapore. It would also be very "unSingaporean" not to understand Singlish.

I do not think it is a cause for worry. A greater worry is the falling standards in our mother tongue languages and loss of knowledge of our dialects.

Seah Li Leng (Madam)


LANGUAGE IS FLUID

Singlish, and all other forms of vernacular English, is an example of how fluid and flexible language is in an ever-changing world.

There will be no place for those who wish to cling to the "glory" of "traditional" British English as time marches on. 

We do recall the past with fondness. The elders of every society will always view their youth with contempt and see their own past through tinted glasses. 

Jonathan Mark Macpherson

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on October 06, 2017, with the headline 'Excerpts from readers' letters'. Print Edition | Subscribe