Employers' obligations change if maids live out

The Ministry of Manpower must consider the implications on employers of foreign domestic workers if Indonesia's plan to introduce live-out maids becomes law ("Indonesia plans to stop sending new live-in maids abroad"; Wednesday, and "Live-out maids 'will lead to more costs, issues'"; yesterday).

If maids live separately from their employers and work regular hours, with rest on public holidays and days off, and also get overtime entitlement, they should be covered under the Employment Act.

Employers should not be obliged to pay a security bond or sign a safety agreement because they won't know and cannot control what the maids do when they leave the house after working hours.

The same argument holds for the purchase of medical and personal accident insurance, and the sending of maids for regular medical checks.

Would the monthly levy still apply and would employers have to bear the cost of sending the maid home?

If maids live elsewhere, the link between employers and maids is broken, without obligation.

If the maid works part time illegally elsewhere or compromises her safety and health after working hours, employers should not be penalised.

We must remember that live-in maids are required to not just take care of various household chores but also take care of children and the old and ailing. They are needed in case of emergencies.

A live-out maid will not serve the same purpose and may become a burden to employers with her other activities.

Francis Cheng

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on May 20, 2016, with the headline 'Employers' obligations change if maids live out'. Print Edition | Subscribe