Do more to thwart e-thieves

I read the experience of Mr Philip Loh with a fraudulent credit card charge of $ 12,327 with grave concern ("Man in row with bank over hacked phone"; Wednesday).

Many of us use credit cards routinely to pay bills using our mobile phones, under the 3D Secure payment system.

However, hackers are getting more sophisticated and creative in entrapping innocent mobile phone users. These electronic thieves also use the latest technology to electronically steal information and data from unsuspecting victims using their mobile devices or computers to complete payment transactions.

It is, therefore, unfair for innocent victims such as Mr Loh to be saddled with fraudulent charges on their credit cards.

Banks need to set up more robust systems to protect their customers, and warnings about malicious software should be conveyed more directly to customers, for example, through mobile phones or e-mail.

Banks can also protect themselves with higher insurance coverage, as such fraudulent incidents are likely to become more prevalent as electronic devices and processes become a more integral part of our lives and hackers become more sophisticated.

Hackers are getting more sophisticated and creative in entrapping innocent mobile phone users.

Experts have said that it is very difficult for a layman to avoid insidious programs, which are often disguised to look legitimate.

The current 3D Secure payment system may also no longer be as secure as we think.

But customers, too, should remain vigilant.

Raymond Koh Bock Swi

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on January 29, 2016, with the headline 'Do more to thwart e-thieves'. Print Edition | Subscribe