Different name, same substance

Just because Integrated Programme (IP) students do not take the O levels does not mean they are not exposed to social studies, which is compulsory at the O levels, or national education ("A welcome lesson in critical thinking"; Jan 21 and "Equip teachers to handle social studies class deftly" by Mrs Marietta Koh; Jan 25).

As indicated on the various IP school websites, Raffles Institution has a Citizenship Education syllabus, which gets students to consider issues close to home, while Dunman High School prides itself on its Active Citizenry Education, a subject showcasing six themes, such as Understanding Governance.

Nanyang Girls' High School and Hwa Chong Institution have an Integrated Humanities Programme covering a range of issues concerning Singapore in a global context.

IP students are encouraged to think critically, with global perspectives in mind.

Opportunities abound for us to draw links between lesson content and the real world.

For example, topics such as Singapore's Population White Paper connect the concepts of governance with Singaporeans in particular.

Integrated Programme students are encouraged to think critically, with global perspectives in mind. Opportunities abound for us to draw links between lesson content and the real world.

These syllabuses involve regular assessments and put students through academic rigour comparable to the level demanded of students taking social studies.

What we learn is merely social studies by a different name, and covers national education all the same.

Goh Tze Yi (Miss)

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on February 04, 2016, with the headline 'Different name, same substance'. Print Edition | Subscribe