Boost awareness, enforcement of code of conduct on shared paths

I share the concern about pedestrian safety on pavements ("Reconsider plans for shared footpaths" by Mr Allein Godfrey Moore; yesterday), but I disagree with banning cycling on these paths.

The Active Mobility Advisory Panel's Code of Conduct clearly states that cyclists and users of personal mobility devices should always give way to pedestrians on footpaths and shared paths.

This is the predominant behaviour currently being practised. Dangerous riders on footpaths are the minority.

We should not punish the majority of safe riders because of the misconduct of a few black sheep. There are black sheep in every group.

For example, there was a small number of dangerous drivers who were largely responsible for the 150 fatal road accidents last year, but we don't ban driving on the road because of them.

The vast majority of cyclists on pavements are slow and safe riders, such as elderly people, housewives and young children. We don't want to see this harmless group being forced onto roads, holding up traffic and risking their lives.

The vast majority of cyclists on pavements are slow and safe riders, such as elderly people, housewives and young children. We don't want to see this harmless group being forced onto roads, holding up traffic and risking their lives when they are able to share footpaths safely with pedestrians.

To minimise dangerous riding on footpaths and shared paths, we should enhance the communication and enforcement of the code of conduct.

Clearly list down the penalties for those who ride dangerously, perhaps including community service, jail time and payment of victims' medical bills.

Chu Wa

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on September 24, 2016, with the headline 'Boost awareness, enforcement of code of conduct on shared paths'. Print Edition | Subscribe