New course gives ICT professionals chance to switch to cyber security

Dr Yaacob Ibrahim (centre) at the opening of Singtel's new cybersecurity institute, with Singtel Group CEO Chua Sock Koong (right).
Dr Yaacob Ibrahim (centre) at the opening of Singtel's new cybersecurity institute, with Singtel Group CEO Chua Sock Koong (right). PHOTO: MATTHIAS HO FOR THE STRAITS TIMES

Infocomm technology (ICT) professionals or engineers with three years' experience can switch to the fast-emerging field of cyber security under a new training scheme.

The Cyber Security Associates and Technologists or CSAT programme is also open to fresh ICT graduates and those with under three years of work experience.

Trainees will acquire practical skills and be mentored by industry experts. They will also receive on-the-job training, local and overseas attachments, and in-depth training through courses.

For fresh graduates and those less experienced on the job, the Cyber Security Associates course can take up to 12 months, while experienced ICT professionals going for the Cyber Security Technologist credential will go through a maximum six-month conversion course.

Upon course completion, they will be able to undertake responsibilities such as security assessment, security operations and technology development of cyber security solutions.

Yesterday, Minister-in-charge of Cyber Security, Dr Yaacob Ibrahim, said that Singtel is the first company to offer the CSAT programme. He was speaking at the opening of the Singtel Cyber Security Institute.

Other local and overseas ICT and security-related companies interested in the CSAT programme include Ernst & Young, Quann, NEC, Palo Alto Networks and ST Electronics.

CSAT is a joint initiative of the Infocomm Development Authority and Cyber Security Agency of Singapore. It was first announced by Dr Yaacob at last year's GovernmentWare conference.

Singtel sees the CSAT programme as a way to beef up its own cyber security workforce. It will use CSAT to convert its ICT professionals to the cyber security field and employ the Cyber Security Associates on completion of their course.

The first batch of Singtel's experienced cyber security professionals will start their course next week.

To qualify for CSAT, ICT professionals must work in ICT or network engineering. For trainees who want to enrol for on-the-job training in specialised areas like threat intelligence, they must already have working experience in cyber security.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on April 27, 2016, with the headline 'New course gives ICT professionals chance to switch to cyber security'. Print Edition | Subscribe