More greenery, space in cluster housing under new URA guidelines

Mont Timah, a group of cluster houses. The Urban Redevelopment Authority has drawn up a new set of guidelines that aim to make cluster housing, or strata landed housing estates, greener and more spacious. -- PHOTO: ST FILE 
Mont Timah, a group of cluster houses. The Urban Redevelopment Authority has drawn up a new set of guidelines that aim to make cluster housing, or strata landed housing estates, greener and more spacious. -- PHOTO: ST FILE 

The Urban Redevelopment Authority has drawn up a new set of guidelines that aim to make cluster housing, or strata landed housing estates, greener and more spacious.

Under the revised guidelines, there is a new set of formulae to determine the maximum number of houses allowed in such developments, the URA said on Friday.

The new formulae will generally result in fewer units compared with the previous formulae.

The guidelines took into account the feedback from residents in landed housing estates that such developments could inject a disproportionately large number of units, causing additional traffic and parking problems as well as creating a more congested living environment, the URA said.

There are also new guidelines to enhance the communal facilities and greenery provision within such developments.

Developers will have to set aside at least 45 per cent of the land area for communal open space, up from the current 30 per cent.

Of this, a minimum of 25 per cent has to be set aside for greenery on the ground while up to 20 per cent can be used for communal facilities such as swimming pools and playgrounds.

The revised guidelines apply with immediate effect from Aug 23.

Cluster housing is a form of landed housing that comes with strata titles, offering home buyers a housing option that combines landed housing living with communal facilities and greenery like those available in private condominiums.