Vard bags contract to design and build 182m vessel, its longest ever

Vard secured a contract for the design and construction of a 182m research expedition vessel.
Vard secured a contract for the design and construction of a 182m research expedition vessel.PHOTO: VARD HOLDINGS
Vard secured a contract for the design and construction of a 182m research expedition vessel.
Vard secured a contract for the design and construction of a 182m research expedition vessel.PHOTO: VARD HOLDINGS

SINGAPORE - Vard Holdings said on Tuesday (May 2) it has secured a contract for the design and construction of a 182-metre research expedition vessel (REV), its longest ship.

Vard's client is Rosellinis Four-10, a company wholly-owned by Norwegian industrialist Kjell Inge Roekke and his family.

Said Mr Roekke: "My very first large factory trawler was built by Vard 30 years ago, and I have enjoyed a great relationship with the team at Vard since then. I know what Vard stands for, and it is a pleasure to come back and build this research expedition vessel together with them."

Developed by Vard Design in collaboration with the customer and the designer Espen Oeino, the ship is expected to enter service in 2020.

Vard said the vessel order is not expected to have any material impact on the company's earnings per share or net tangible assets per share for the current financial year.

 

With its length of 182 metres, the vessel will be the longest ever designed and built by Vard.

Its hull will be built at Vard Tulcea in Romania, and towed to Vard Brattvaag in Norway for outfitting. After delivery in Norway, the vessel will return to Romania for fairing, deck laying and finalization of the accommodation area.

The highly specialized vessel is tailor-made for worldwide research and expedition activities, with the objective of developing knowledge and sustainable solutions to address the ocean's environmental challenges, said Vard. WWF Norway has been invited by the shipowner to take part in the further development of the research and expedition project.

Equipped with the latest technology on board, the vessel will be one of the most advanced research expedition vessels in the world, said Vard. Equipment for monitoring and surveying marine areas, currents, the seabed, fish, animals and plant life in all of the world's oceans will be available on the vessel.

Added Mr Roekke: "The REV will be a platform for gathering knowledge. I would like to welcome researchers, environmental groups, and other institutions on board, to acquire new skills to evolve innovative solutions to address challenges and opportunities connected to the seas."