DBS adopts cloud-based productivity technology

DBS has introduced Microsoft's cloud-based productivity tool, Microsoft Office 365, to about 1,000 local staff as part of a test run.
DBS has introduced Microsoft's cloud-based productivity tool, Microsoft Office 365, to about 1,000 local staff as part of a test run.PHOTO: REUTERS

Staff will be able to work together anywhere, using Microsoft devices like PCs and tablets

Cloud-based technology has become popular with consumers over the years and now institutions are embracing it, with DBS becoming the first Singapore bank to bring it to its offices.

DBS announced yesterday that it has introduced Microsoft's cloud- based productivity tool Microsoft Office 365 to about 1,000 local staff as part of a test run.

The aim is to move 22,000 employees across 18 markets over to the tool by the end of the year.

The cloud-based technology allows staff to work together anywhere, across PCs, tablets and smartphones, using Microsoft products. For instance, meetings can be held via video conference technology like Skype for Business, which in turn cuts down on travelling time.

Mr David Gledhill, head of technology and operations at DBS, said in a statement yesterday: "In the last few years, we have made good headway in creating a 'fintech-like' workforce that is focused on making the customer experience simpler and more seamless.

"Inculcating a digital mindset in our people aside, it is also important to give them work tools that break down silos, enhance collaboration, foster greater efficiency and facilitate working on the go."

The bank added: "Microsoft has listened to industry leaders and regulators about their requirements, concerns and desires for cloud- based services, and learnt about the industry's needs surrounding compliance, security, privacy and control.

"Through these, Microsoft ensured its cloud platforms and services provide a regulatory framework that meets those needs."

The remarks come at a time of increasing concern over cyber security for large organisations and corporations.

For instance, The Straits Times reported earlier this month that the Singapore Government is hiving off Web surfing from public servants' work computers.

The move, which will take effect next May across 100,000 computers, aims to halt potential leaks from work e-mail and shared documents.

Microsoft Singapore managing director Jessica Tan said the DBS move will increase personal and organisational productivity, and employees also will be able to engage customers in new ways through new insights "that will ultimately help the bank transform its products and services".

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on June 28, 2016, with the headline 'DBS adopts cloud-based productivity technology'. Print Edition | Subscribe