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World pledges more money to protect biodiversity

Published on Oct 20, 2012 7:39 PM
 
An Indian farmer shows examples of sustainable cotton intiative practices during a visit of unseen British Environment Minister Richard Benyon in fields of Warangal District, some 170km north-east of Hyderabad on Oct 18, 2012. Negotiators were struggling on Oct 19, 2012, to persuade wealthy nations to bankroll ambitious targets for stemming the loss of Earth's dwindling natural resources. Efforts to stem the worrying loss of Earth's dwindling natural resources received a boost on Saturday when a United Nations conference in India agreed to double biodiversity aid to poor countries. But in a week that saw 400 plants and animals added to a "Red List" at risk of extinction, some observers said this was not enough to reverse the decline in species and habitats that humans depend on for food, shelter and livelihoods. -- PHOTO:  AFP

HYDERABAD (AFP) - Efforts to stem the worrying loss of Earth's dwindling natural resources received a boost on Saturday when a United Nations (UN) conference in India agreed to double biodiversity aid to poor countries.

But in a week that saw 400 plants and animals added to a "Red List" at risk of extinction, some observers said this was not enough to reverse the decline in species and habitats that humans depend on for food, shelter and livelihoods.

A quarter of the world's mammals, 13 per cent of birds, 41 per cent of amphibians and 33 per cent of reef-building corals are now at risk of extinction, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

"Efforts to conserve nature must be urgently scaled up if we want to meet the 2020 deadline to save all life on Earth," it said of the deal.

 
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