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Rwanda in diplomatic trouble 20 years after genocide

Published on Jan 21, 2014 10:49 AM
 
Members of the Rwanda National Congress opposition party shouting slogans while holding pictures of slain party founder Patrick Karegeya (left) and posters of Rwandan President Paul Kagame (right) reading "wanted war criminal" during a demonstration outside the Rwandan embassy in Pretoria on Jan 9, 2014. As Rwanda marks 20 years since its 1994 genocide, the government is seeking to stress the strides the country has made since those dark days, despite international concern over its hardline leader. -- FILE PHOTO: AFP  

KIGALI (AFP) - As Rwanda marks 20 years since its 1994 genocide, the government is seeking to stress the strides the country has made since those dark days, despite international concern over its hardline leader.

Fiercely proud of its legacy, Kigali is displaying a country at peace, enjoying some of the best security on the continent and hailed by global financial institutions for its pro-reform, business-friendly agenda.

But the seemingly hardening stance of strongman Paul Kagame, Rwanda's president, is casting a shadow over the country's relations with the outside world.

Accused of backing rebel warlords who recruit child soldiers in neighbouring Democratic Republic of Congo and suspected of eliminating exiled dissidents, Kagame now appears to be suffering a backlash.

 
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