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Obama fails to persuade Americans on NSA reform: Poll

Published on Jan 22, 2014 6:23 AM
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United States(US) President Barack Obama speaks about the National Security Agency at the Justice Department, on Jan 17, 2014 in Washington, DC. Reforms to US surveillance announced by Mr Obama have failed to reassure most Americans, with three-quarters saying their privacy will not be be better protected under the changes, according to a new poll. -- FILE PHOTO: AFP

WASHINGTON (AFP) - Reforms to United States (US) surveillance announced by President Barack Obama have failed to reassure most Americans, with three-quarters saying their privacy will not be be better protected under the changes, according to a new poll.

By a margin of 73 to 21 per cent, Americans who followed Mr Obama's speech last week on the National Security Agency (NSA) say his proposals will not make much difference when it comes to safeguarding privacy rights, said the Pew Research Center/USA Today poll published on Tuesday.

The poll of 1,504 adults, carried out between Wednesday and Sunday, showed the speech was not widely followed by Americans and that scepticism of the NSA's electronic spying is growing.

The survey said half of those surveyed heard "nothing at all" about Mr Obama's proposed measures and another 41 per cent said they heard "only a little bit". And fully seven in 10 poll respondents said they should not have to give up privacy to stay safe from potential terror attacks, the poll said.

 
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