Monday, Dec 22, 2014Monday, Dec 22, 2014

News

 

German brewers want Unesco listing for 'pure' beer

Published on Dec 2, 2013 6:39 PM
 
A guest holding a glass of Cologne "Koelsch" beer on in Cologne, western Germany. German brewers say a five-century-old beer purity law deserves a spot on the Unesco list for "intangible cultural heritage". -- FILE PHOTO: AFP

BERLIN (AFP) - German brewers say a five-century-old beer purity law deserves a spot on the Unesco list for "intangible cultural heritage".

The law, called the 'Reinheitsgebot' in German, was introduced in Bavaria in 1516 and adopted nation-wide in 1906. It dictates that only water, malt, hops and yeast, and no flavourings or preservatives, may be used to make beer.

"If Germany is still regarded as the undisputed beer nation, that is due to the Reinheitsgebot," said Hans-Georg Eils, president of the German Brewers Federation.

Its acceptance to the world heritage list "would be for German brewers and maltsters a sign of appreciation and an incentive at the same time," Eils added.

 
If you are not a subscriber, you can get instant, unlimited access here