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Seas rising faster than projected, low areas threatened: Study

Published on Nov 28, 2012 8:35 AM
 
The Sheldon Glacier with Mount Barre in the background, is seen from Ryder Bay near Rothera Research Station, Adelaide Island, Antarctica, in this handout photo from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change had said seas could rise between 18cm and 59cm this century, not counting a possible acceleration of the melt of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets that could more still water to the oceans. A recent study said, however, that sea levels are rising 60 per cent faster than UN projections, threatening low-lying areas from Miami to the Maldives. -- PHOTO: REUTERS

DOHA (REUTERS) - Sea levels are rising 60 per cent faster than United Nations (UN) projections, threatening low-lying areas from Miami to the Maldives, a study said on Wednesday.

The report, issued during UN talks in Qatar on combating climate change, also said temperatures were creeping higher in line with UN scenarios, rejecting hopes the rate had been exaggerated.

"Global warming has not slowed down, (nor is it) lagging behind the projections," said Professor Stefan Rahmstorf, lead author at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research that compared UN projections to what has actually happened from the early 1990s to 2011.

The study said sea levels had been rising by 3.2mm a year according to satellite data, 60 per cent faster than the 2mm annual rise projected by the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) over that period.

 
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