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It's no game: Xbox-sensor guards Korean border

Published on Feb 6, 2014 1:01 PM
 
A South Korean soldier keeps vigil at an observation point, on the southern side of the demilitarised zone (DMZ), Paju, on July 7, 2006. Microsoft's movement-recognition Kinect software has morphed from virtual shooter gaming to the real-life challenge of guarding the world's last Cold War border. -- FILE PHOTO: AFP

SEOUL (AFP) - Microsoft's movement-recognition Kinect software has morphed from virtual shooter gaming to the real-life challenge of guarding the world's last Cold War border.

The sensor allowing hands-free play on the Xbox is the basis for a security device now deployed along the demilitarised zone (DMZ) that separates North and South Korea, after being adapted by a South Korean programmer.

Four kilometres wide and 248 kilometres long, the DMZ is a depopulated no-man's land of heavily fortified fences that bristles with the landmines and listening posts of two nations that technically remain at war.

As a military buffer zone, it remains an area of profound Cold War hostility, but its man-made isolation has also created an accidental wildlife park recognised as one of the best-preserved habitats on Earth.

 
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