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Indians broke Australian isolation 4,000 years ago: Study

Published on Jan 15, 2013 7:50 PM
 
This file photo taken on Oct 1, 2010, shows Warrmarn-Kija Aborigines performing in Sydney. People from the Indian sub-continent migrated to Australia and mixed with Aborigines 4,000 years ago, bringing the dingo dog with them, according to a study published on Jan 15, 2013. --PHOTO: AFP 

SYDNEY (AFP) - Ancient Indians migrated to Australia and mixed with Aborigines 4,000 years ago, bringing the dingo's ancestor with them, according to new research that re-evaluates the continent's long isolation before European settlement.

The vast southern continent was thought to have been cut off from other populations until Europeans landed at the end of the 1700s, but the latest genetic and archaeological evidence throws that theory out.

Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, reported "evidence of substantial gene flow between Indian populations and Australia about 4,000 years ago".

They analysed genetic variations across the genome from Australian Aborigines to New Guineans, South-east Asians, and Indians, including Dravidian speakers from the south.

 
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