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Pressure increases for plane tracking after MH370

Published on Apr 6, 2014 2:52 PM
 
A Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) Orion aircraft (back) prepares to take off from RAAF Base Pearce near Perth on April 6, 2014. Four weeks into the hunt for MH370, pressure is building for better ways of tracking aircraft as regulators wrestle with the Malaysian jet's disappearance armed with only minimal information on the fate of its 239 passengers and crew. -- PHOTO: REUTERS

(REUTERS) - Four weeks into the hunt for MH370, pressure is building for better ways of tracking aircraft as regulators wrestle with the Malaysian jet's disappearance armed with only minimal information on the fate of its 239 passengers and crew.

As search efforts intensified on Saturday, four weeks after the Boeing 777 went missing, a US pilots association called for existing satellite technology to be made mandatory so controllers can track jets.

Missing Malaysia Airlines MH370 special report

Until recently, aircraft flying over oceans well outside the reach of air traffic control routinely gave their position through high-frquency radio links that are vulnerable to interference from the atmosphere.

 
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