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Malaysia police is not ready to release information on probe into MH370: Police chief

Published on Mar 25, 2014 6:22 PM
 
Malaysia's police chief Khalid Abu Bakar answers questions during a press conference at a hotel near Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Sepang on March 16, 2014. The Malaysian police is not ready to release any findings related to MH370 as doing so will jeopardise ongoing investigations. -- FILE PHOTO: AFP

The Malaysian police is not ready to release any findings related to MH370 as doing so will jeopardise ongoing investigations.

Police chief Khalid Abu Bakar said this at a press briefing on Tuesday when asked about the probe into the crashed Malaysian Airlines plane.

But he said that investigations into Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah's flight simulator are still underway.

Earlier reports said police have so far interviewed more than 100 people in their investigations, including the wives and family members of pilot Captain Zaharie and co-pilot Fariq Abdul Hamid.

In response to criticisms from families, Acting Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein, who was also at the press briefing, said Malaysia has always been transparent.

Dozens of angry relatives protested outside the Malaysian embassy in Beijing on Tuesday, accusing Kuala Lumpur of "delays and deception".

The long wait for a definitive answer on the fate of MH370 came to an end on Monday night when Prime Minister Najib Razak announced that the plane "ended" its journey in the southern Indian Ocean.

He cited new and unprecedented analysis of satellite data for the conclusion, which triggered an outpouring of grief among the families of the 239 passengers and crew on board, as well as countless others around the world who have been following every development since the jetliner went missing on March 8.

Search for the aircraft were suspended on Tuesday due to bad weather.

Australian officials remained cautious about confirming the location of MH370.

While acknowledging that satellite data was the best they could go on, Defence Minister David Johnston told reporters on Tuesday: "This is a mystery and until we recover and positively identify a piece of debris, everything is virtually speculation."

Australia's vice chief of defence force Mark Binskin, speaking alongside Mr Johnston, said: "We are not searching for a needle in a haystack, we are still trying to define where the haystack is."

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