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Cockpit transcript under probe, but no sign of abnormality: Minister

Published on Mar 22, 2014 5:53 PM
 
A man reads a local newspaper with its front page showing ocean gyre in the Indian Ocean might be affecting search for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, in Kuala Lumpur March 22, 2014. A transcript of the final 54 minutes of conversation between air traffic controller and the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 is under probe and cannot be publicly released at this stage, but it shows no sign of abnormality, said Malaysia's Acting Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein. -- PHOTO: REUTERS

SEPANG - A transcript of the final 54 minutes of conversation between air traffic controller and the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 is under probe and cannot be publicly released at this stage, but it shows no sign of abnormality, said Malaysia's Acting Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein.

"The original transcript of the conversation between MH370 and Malaysian air traffic control is with the investigations team, where it is being analysed." Mr Hishammuddin confirmed on Saturday's press briefing, "I can however confirm that the transcript does not indicate anything abnormal." 

Civil Aviation chief Azharuddin Abdul Razak added that the initial report on the cockpit conversation by The Daily Telegraph is not accurate, but he did not elaborate further. 

The British paper on Friday released the purported cockpit transcript, which it said was translated from a Mandarin version.

It contains words exchanged between Malaysian air traffic controllers and the pilots on board MH370, including the last words "All right, good night", believed to have come from first officer Fariq Abdul Hamid.

Quoting analysts, the paper flagged two parts of the transcript as potentially unusual.

At 1:07am, MH370 communicated that it was flying at a cruising altitude of 35,000 feet, or more than 10km above sea level. This information was conveyed just six minutes ago.

It was also at 1:07am that the plane's ACARS signalling device sent its last message before it was disabled sometime in the next 30 minutes.

As for the flight's cargo manifest, Mr Hishammuddin said it is with the investigation team and will be released in due course. 

"Preliminary investigation of the cargo manifest has not shown any link to anything that might have contributed to MH370's disappearance.

"As was stated yesterday, all cargo carried on MH370 was in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organisation and International Air Transport Association standards," the minister added. 

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