Friday, Jul 11, 2014Friday, Jul 11, 2014
 

Wine making takes root in long-isolated Myanmar

Published on Jan 29, 2013 11:41 AM
PRINT EMAIL
 
This picture taken on August 5, 2012 shows labourers walking past a vineyard as they leave after work at the Red Mountain estate near Inle Lake in Myanmar's eastern Shan State. Myanmar may be best known for its decades of junta rule, but behind the bamboo curtain maverick entrepreneurs have toiled for years to put the nation on the map for the quality of its wine. -- PHOTO: AFP

INLE LAKE (AFP) - Myanmar may be best known for its decades of junta rule, but behind the bamboo curtain maverick entrepreneurs have toiled for years to put the nation on the map for the quality of its wine.

Vines cascade down terraces overlooking the vast mirror of Inle Lake in northeastern Myanmar, an unlikely setting for a budding wine industry tempting the tastebuds of tourists now flocking to the country as it opens up.

"Everybody is surprised to see a vineyard here in the middle of Myanmar with all this modern equipment," said Mr Francois Raynal, winemaker at the Red Mountain estate in Shan State.

The vineyard, which produces roughly 120,000 bottles a year that fetch about 10,000 kyat (S$13.61) apiece, has itself become a draw for foreigners intrigued that vines could grow in the tropical country.

 
If you are not a subscriber, you can get instant, unlimited access here

Videos