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The chiselled looks of lover boy Rhydian Vaughan

This article first appeared in The New Paper on Sept 27.

Published on Sep 29, 2012 12:28 PM
 
Rhydian Vaughan has the chiselled good looks that send the hearts of women – and some men – fluttering. -- PHOTO: FESTIVE FILMS

 

That’s probably one reason the British-Taiwanese actor was cast in his latest movie Gf*Bf, a moving film about the long-standing love between three friends from high school to adulthood.

Vaughan, 24, plays hot-blooded Aaron, who loves Mabel (Kwai Lun Mei), who in turn loves Liam (Joseph Chang), who actually loves Aaron.

Aaron manages to win Mabel’s heart, but they break up when he cheats on her in university. He can’t forget her even after he marries another woman.

The Taiwanese film, which spans from the 1980s to the present, is directed by Yang Ya-Che and opens here today.

In a phone interview with FiRST from Taiwan, Vaughan shared that his first love was equally unforgettable.

They were both 17 then and studying in the same school in Taiwan.

"It was really pure, exciting yet painful. It’s like the first time you see a flower blossom, or smell the scent of roses for the first time.

“It made our problems go away and made us want to fight for what we believed in,” Vaughan said.

“Looking back, the small moments were the most exciting, like the walks to and from school together, and the times after our lessons.”

The romance went on for around two to three years, and they broke up when he moved to England for his university studies and the girl “did whatever she had to do”.

He added: “(Our romance) was something so precious to us. Even the regrets are happy things that have become precious moments I cherished. I won’t put a negative thing in it. I’ve put it in a safe place (to remember by).”

To him, love carries different meanings at different stages of a person’s life.

“When you are a teen, love is something to experiment and have fun with, where you have no regrets,” he said.

“And when you are in university, your world gets bigger. Your perceived ideas change and you get new ideas every day.

“Love becomes something else again when you become parents. The love for your children is unconditional.

“But the one common thing in love throughout the different stages of life is desire. It drives all creatures. If there is no desire, people will not want to make love and create life.”

He can be a romantic person at times, and his idea of what’s romantic is to share his life and thoughts with his girl. But he declined to say if he’s seeing anyone now.

Vaughan first found fame through the hit 2010 Taiwanese movie Monga, where he played Dragon, a teenage gang leader and son of a powerful triad leader.

But instead of riding on the success of Monga for a quick career boost like his co-stars, Ethan Juan and Mark Chao, Vaughan went back to school and graduated from the East 15 Acting School in Essex, UK, last year.

He told us he wanted to pursue his education “more than everything else” and did not have any regrets, because it made him grow up and gave him solid acting training.

He played a chef in the Taiwanese TV drama Love Recipe last year, and Gf*Bf is his first movie after Monga.

Vaughan recalled a scene in Gf*Bf which he had to repeat around 20 times.

In it, he was riding a motorcycle with Chang riding pillion, and both had firecrackers thrown at them from a car.

He said: “I thought filming would go smoothly, but there were technical difficulties and the timing (for everything) had to be right.

“The motorbike I was riding was an old bike and it had a lot of personality. It wasn’t too happy with me riding it (and acted up).”

So was it tougher to film that scene or the many emotional ones in the film?

Vaughan replied: “I wouldn’t define anything as tough. I love what I do and they become more than just challenges. They become things I have to do.

“If you think something is tough, you allow yourself to fail.”

He added that a lot of the emotional material was worked into the film spontaneously because the director, the cinematographer and the actors wanted to create something new, outside of the original script.

“Very often, we received the script the same morning we filmed the scene. A lot of things that happened on set weren’t planned, and my co-star wouldn’t know some of the changes too,” he said.

“For example, (Chang) didn’t know I would kiss him in one scene. As an actor, he was fine with the kiss, but his character was frustrated and there were a lot of organic emotions and reactions coming from him. That was what the director wanted.”

Vaughan has just completed the Taiwanese idol love drama Die Sterntaler, where he plays a doctor who loses his memory after an accident in Taiwan and forgets about his fiancee, who’s waiting for him in Japan.

This article first appeared in The New Paper on Sept 27.

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