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India's anti-corruption party tested in Delhi polls

Published on Dec 4, 2013 9:17 PM
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Voters line up in a queue outside a polling booth to cast their vote during the state assembly election in Delhi, on Dec 4, 2013. A new Indian political party rooted in an anti-corruption movement that swept the country in 2011 faced its first electoral test on Wednesday, Dec 4, 2013, as voters in New Delhi headed to the polls. -- PHOTO: REUTERS

NEW DELHI (AFP) - A new Indian political party rooted in an anti-corruption movement that swept the country in 2011 faced its first electoral test on Wednesday as voters in New Delhi headed to the polls.

The Aam Aadmi ("Common Man") Party, led by former tax inspector Arvind Kejriwal, is hoping for a victory in the New Delhi state election that would be a political earthquake ahead of national polls next year.

New Delhi, whose 16.8 million inhabitants elect their own assembly, has been run by the Congress party since 1998 but it is seen as struggling with voter fatigue, inflation and anger over crime against women and corruption.

Kejriwal cast his vote at a polling station in central Delhi early on Wednesday accompanied by about 100 supporters wearing white Gandhi caps which, along with a broom, has become the party's trademark.

 
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