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Fury over US spying spreads to South-East Asia

Published on Oct 29, 2013 10:50 PM
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Points in the map show the United States' various listening posts in Asia. Leading South-east Asian nations voiced indignation and dismay as fresh revelations about US spying suggested that several countries in the region too were targets of high-tech surveillance mounted by the US National Security Agency. -- ST GRAPHICS

LEADING South-east Asian nations voiced indignation and dismay as fresh revelations about US spying suggested that several countries in the region too were targets of high-tech surveillance mounted by the National Security Agency.

On a day when senior officials in US President Barack Obama’s administration said the American leader may ban spying on leaders of allied nations, Germany’s Der Spiegel published a map on its website showing 90 surveillance facilities in US embassies worldwide.

These included stations in East, South-east and Southern Asia. Fourteen of the facilities are remotely operated, while the others are manned. Among them are embassies in Jakarta, Kuala Lumpur, Bangkok, Phnom Penh, Yangon, Beijing, New Delhi and Islamabad, according to information disclosed by intelligence leaker Edward Snowden.

“We will register a strong protest... if we confirm such a facility exists in the US Embassy in Indonesia,” Indonesian Foreign Minister Marty Natalegawa told reporters in Jakarta. “If the facility exists, it is certainly unacceptable.”

 
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