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Asiana Airlines crash pilots knew speed was low

Published on Dec 11, 2013 10:09 PM
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An Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 plane is engulfed in smoke on the tarmac after a crash landing at San Francisco International Airport in California on July 6, 2013, in this handout file photo provided by passenger Eugene Anthony Rah, released to Reuters on July 8, 2013. Pilots of an Asiana Airlines plane that crash-landed in San Francisco in July were aware that the plane was travelling too slowly and tried to correct it in the final seconds before impact, documents released on Wednesday, Dec 11, 2013, by US aviation safety investigators show. -- FILE PHOTO: REUTERS

WASHINGTON (REUTERS, AP) - Pilots of an Asiana Airlines plane that crash-landed in San Francisco in July were aware that the plane was travelling too slowly and tried to correct it in the final seconds before impact, documents released on Wednesday by US aviation safety investigators show.

The crash on July 6 killed three people and injured more than 180, the first fatal commercial airplane crash in the US since February 2009.

The co-pilot of the jet, who was training the pilot flying the plane, thought the auto-throttle on the Boeing Co 777 plane might not have been operating, the documents show. The pilot who was flying the plane said he wasn't sure whether auto-throttle was maintaining speed, documents show.

Lee Kang Kuk, a 46-year-old pilot for the Korean airline who was landing the big jet for his first time at San Francisco, “stated it was very difficult to perform a visual approach with a heavy airplane,” according to an investigative report released Wednesday.

 
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