Tsai's lieutenants

Dr Wu (left) is expected to have a big role in triangulating Taiwan's position vis-a-vis China and the US, while Ms Chang (below, left) is the top official in charge of cross-strait relationships.
Dr Wu (above) is expected to have a big role in triangulating Taiwan's position vis-a-vis China and the US, while Ms Chang is the top official in charge of cross-strait relationships.
Dr Wu (left) is expected to have a big role in triangulating Taiwan's position vis-a-vis China and the US, while Ms Chang (below, left) is the top official in charge of cross-strait relationships.
Dr Wu is expected to have a big role in triangulating Taiwan's position vis-a-vis China and the US, while Ms Chang (above) is the top official in charge of cross-strait relationships.

LIN CHUAN,

64 Premier

When introducing Mr Lin as her pick for premier, President-elect Tsai Ing-wen said: "He is the person most familiar with my political convictions and plans for the nation." This will be critical. As premier, Mr Lin will have the job of translating Ms Tsai's vision into policies.

He has no party affiliation but has long been associated with the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP). He was finance minister in the Chen Shui-bian administration, and later helmed the party's think-tank Thinking Taiwan Foundation.

His background is in finance and economics - he has a bachelor's degree in economics from Fu Jen Catholic University, a master's degree in public finance from National Chengchi University and a PhD in economics from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. This will serve him well, given the pressing need for the new government to reform the economy.

JOSEPH WU,

61 Secretary-General of National Security Council

Articulate and fluent in English, Dr Wu - he holds a PhD in political science from Ohio State University - has been the suave face of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) as its secretary-general in the post-Chen years.

Now, he will be wielding great influence in the powerful position of National Security Council chief, coordinating and directing policies relating to Taiwan's security issues.

He is expected to have enormous input in triangulating Taiwan's position vis-a-vis China and the United States.

He served in the Chen administration in various capacities including as Taiwan's representative to the US. He was also Mainland Affairs Council Minister, taking over from his current boss, Ms Tsai.

KATHARINE CHANG,

63 Mainland Affairs Council Minister

Three years ago, in an interview, she characterised Taiwan's relationship with mainland China as being in its "best shape" since 1949.

She will now have the challenge of maintaining it, having been appointed the top official in charge of cross-strait relations.

She is expected to be a steady pair of hands, who will faithfully execute Ms Tsai's instructions.

A career diplomat, she filled senior posts as Taiwan's representative to Australia and Britain. She also chaired the Coordination Council for North American Affairs in the Foreign Affairs ministry.

She has a bachelor's degree in diplomacy from National Chengchi University, and also a master's degree in international relations from Long Island University.

Li Xueying

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on May 02, 2016, with the headline 'Tsai's lieutenants'. Print Edition | Subscribe