South Korea activists to launch anti-North leaflets

Members of conservative civic groups, which consists of South Koreans and North Korean defectors, releasing balloons towards North Korea in Yeoncheon, near the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas, north of Seoul early on August 21, 2013. The
Members of conservative civic groups, which consists of South Koreans and North Korean defectors, releasing balloons towards North Korea in Yeoncheon, near the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas, north of Seoul early on August 21, 2013. The balloons contain soap, socks, condoms, rubber gloves, toothpaste, toothbrushes and leaflets denouncing the North Korean regime. The banner reads: "Pyongyang citizens living in the South and the North, Let's unite, break Kim Jong-Un's three generations hereditary regime and move a date up for recovery of Pyongyang." -- PHOTO: REUTERS

SEOUL (AFP) - South Korean activists and North Korean defectors plan to launch anti-Pyongyang leaflets across the border on Friday - a move guaranteed to infuriate the North which has threatened to shell such events in the past.

Organisers said 60 people would take part in the launch - using helium balloons - to protest Pyongyang's decision to postpone a scheduled reunion for families separated by the 1950-53 Korean War.

"We will let our compatriots in the North know about the inhumane action of the North that blocked the reunion," the organisers said in a statement on Wednesday.

The balloons will carry tens of thousands of leaflets, urging North Koreans to rise up against the ruling Kim dynasty.

The same activist group had planned a similar exercise a year ago, but were prevented by police after the North Korean military said it would respond with a "merciless" strike on the protest site.

Launches in April, May and June were also shut down by police, citing security concerns raised by local residents.

Millions of Koreans were separated from family members by the Korean War that sealed the division of the peninsula.

Several hundred had been due to attend a reunion last month at the North's Mount Kumgang resort, but Pyongyang called it off at the last minute, citing South Korean "hostility."

The cancellation soured a thaw in cross-border relations after months of heightened tensions that followed the North's nuclear test in February.