Marking first anniversary of Nepal quake

A baby who miraculously survived last year's deadly Nepal earthquake at two-days-old, is still living in a makeshift shed as his family awaits support to reconstruct their flattened home.
People in Nepal releasing balloons at Kathmandu Durbar Square last Saturday in memory of the 9,000 people killed in an earthquake that hit the country a year ago. 	Thousands of people gathered at the tourist landmark, which was damaged during the 7.8
PHOTO: EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY

People in Nepal releasing balloons at Kathmandu Durbar Square last Saturday in memory of the 9,000 people killed in an earthquake that hit the country a year ago.     

Thousands of people gathered at the tourist landmark, which was damaged during the 7.8-magnitude earthquake. The disaster struck on April 25, but commemorations were also held yesterday - the quake anniversary according to the Nepalese calendar.     

Apart from the damage to hundreds of thousands of homes, the disaster reduced more than a hundred monuments to rubble and damaged another 560 structures, including many centuries-old temples and royal palaces, in the Kathmandu valley that used to attract visitors from around the world.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on April 25, 2016, with the headline 'Marking first anniversary of Nepal quake'. Print Edition | Subscribe