Girls are 'far more responsible for rape': Delhi bus rapist

Indian political and civil society activists take part in a vigil to mark the second anniversary of the fatal gang-rape of a student in the Indian capital, at the bus stop in the Munirka area of New Delhi on Dec 16, 2014. One of the men convicte
Indian political and civil society activists take part in a vigil to mark the second anniversary of the fatal gang-rape of a student in the Indian capital, at the bus stop in the Munirka area of New Delhi on Dec 16, 2014. One of the men convicted for the brutal Delhi bus rape in 2012 has blamed his late victim, saying that "a girl is far more responsible for rape than a boy". -- PHOTO: AFP

One of the men convicted for the brutal Delhi bus rape in 2012 has blamed his late victim, saying that "a girl is far more responsible for rape than a boy".

In a BBC documentary interview from jail, Mukesh Singh, who was driving the bus while five other men took turns to rape and assault a 23-year-old medical student, also said she should not have fought back.

"When being raped, she shouldn't fight back," he said. "She should just be silent and allow the rape. Then they'd have dropped her off after doing her and only hit the boy."

The victim, known as Jyoti, boarded an off-duty bus with her boyfriend after watching a movie on Dec 16, 2012.

She was assaulted and then thrown from the bus, severely bruised and suffering internal injuries from being attacked with metal bars.

The Indian government flew her to Singapore for treatment but she succumbed to her injuries on Dec 29.

Rape is one of the most common crime against women in India. The extreme brutality in Jyoti's case sparked massive outrage leading to street protests of unprecedented scale. The story also dominated news headlines, both within the country and internationally.

Four of the attackers, except for a juvenile and a man who died while awaiting trial, were sentenced to death by an India court in 2013.

Singh, who is appealing his sentence, claimed that the death penalty "will make things even more dangerous for girls".

"Before, they would rape and say, 'Leave her, she won't tell anyone.'," he said. "Now when they rape, especially the criminal types, they will just kill the girl. Death."

Filmmaker Leslee Udwin, who did the interview with Singh, spent two years making a documentary about the bus attack, exploring its impact on Indian society and gender equality. It is titled India's Daughter and will be shown on BBC Four on March 8, which marks International Women's Day.