5 things about Nobel Peace Prize winner Kailash Satyarthi

Indian children's right activist Kailash Satyarthi waves to the media at his office in New Delhi on Oct 10, 2014. Mr Satyarthi, 60, and Malala Yousafzai, 17, from Pakistan, were jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday. -- PHOTO: REUTERS
Indian children's right activist Kailash Satyarthi waves to the media at his office in New Delhi on Oct 10, 2014. Mr Satyarthi, 60, and Malala Yousafzai, 17, from Pakistan, were jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday. -- PHOTO: REUTERS

Children's rights activist Kailash Satyarthi, 60, from India, and Malala Yousafzai, 17, from Pakistan, were jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday.

Mr Satyarthi gave up a lucrative career as an electrical engineer in 1980 and founded the Bachpan Bachao Andolan or Save the Childhood Movement. He has freed tens of thousands of Indian children forced into slavery by businessmen, land owners and others. Here are five things about him:

1. Mr Satyarthi is the second Nobel Peace prize winner from India after Mother Teresa, but the first India-born person to receive the honour. Mother Teresa, who cared for the poor and sick in India, was born in Albania.

In all, India has produced seven Nobel laureates - including Mr Satyarthi - who were honoured in prize categories such as literature, physics and economics.

2. Mr Satyarthi, who lives in New Delhi, India, with his wife and their children, has survived numerous attacks on his life during his crusade to end child labour.

In 2011, the activist and his colleagues were attacked while they were rescuing child slaves from garment sweatshops.

3. The 60 year-old began his activism career at an early age.

When he was six, he noticed a boy his age cleaning shoes on the steps outside the school. Seeing many such children working instead of schooling, he was decided to make the cause his career when he grew older.

4. Despite becoming a globally recognised figure, Mr Satyarthi still hits the ground to lead raids to free slaves, according to US broadcaster, PBS. He believes that he must be involved in a range of activities - from grassroots to visionary types - to win the fight against child labour.

5. He spearheads the South Asian Coalition on Child Servitude, also known as SAACS, among other groups. He also helps to oversee a transition centre in the western Indian state of Rajasthan where newly freed labourers learn fresh skills.