What's News: November 15, 2016

England caretaker manager Gareth Southgate during the World Cup qualifying match against Scotland in Wembley Stadiumlast week.
England caretaker manager Gareth Southgate during the World Cup qualifying match against Scotland in Wembley Stadiumlast week.PHOTO: REUTERS
A landslide on New Zealand's South Island after the quake.
A landslide on New Zealand's South Island after the quake.PHOTO: REUTERS
Body X - The Rehearsal directors Danny Yeo and Li Xie (sitting, second and third from left), and members of the cast.
Body X - The Rehearsal directors Danny Yeo and Li Xie (sitting, second and third from left), and members of the cast.PHOTO: BODY X PRODUCTIONS

TOP OF THE NEWS

Boost for S'pore-Jakarta ties

Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong and Indonesian President Joko Widodo officially opened the Park by the Bay joint venture project and witnessed the signing of a memorandum of understanding on tourism cooperation as they held their first Leaders' Retreat yesterday. PM Lee also lauded his host's fight against haze and said it had "made a difference this year".

TOP OF THE NEWS

NZ quake could be two quakes

The deadly quake that struck New Zealand yesterday may have been closely spaced double tremors on separate fault lines, one triggering the other, said scientists. What remains unknown - and disconcerting - is whether the aftershocks that continue were just that, or foreshocks preceding another large earthquake. 

WORLD

Fresh violence in Rakhine

Myanmar's Rakhine state was hit by a fresh wave of violence at the weekend, with more than 30 insurgents killed over two days of fighting. The surge in fighting came as new satellite images showed alleged evidence of mass arson attacks against Rohingya villages. 

WORLD

Tokyo, Seoul to share intel

Amid a growing North Korean nuclear threat, former adversaries Japan and South Korea have agreed to sign a pact to share military intelligence. The pact is expected to run into opposition in South Korea, where Tokyo's colonial rule and wartime atrocities still rankle. 

OPINION

Thai King's long-term legacy

Few countries in Asia can relate to Thailand's loss of King Bhumibol Adulyadej as much as Singapore, whose founding prime minister died last year but left it with strong institutions. Thailand also needs to build new democratic institutions, writes Thitinan Pongsudhirak. 

HOME

Embryo screening trial for IVF

Women who want to take part in an embryo screening trial for in-vitro fertilisation must be at least 35 or have had at least two failed pregnancies or implants, the National University Hospital has announced. Singapore is looking at allowing such screenings.

HOME

Ranking toilet cleanliness

The dirtiest toilets in Singapore hawker centres and coffee shops are those in the neighbourhood of the Singapore River, Boon Lay and Bukit Panjang, according to a survey. The cleanest are those in the Marina South and Western Water Catchment areas. 

BUSINESS

Swissco eyes court rescue plan

Debt-saddled Swissco Holdings will file for interim judicial management over the next few days after its main lenders rejected its financial restructuring plan, the rig and vessel chartering group said yesterday. 

SPORT

Southgate faces tough Spanish test

When England and Spain meet in today's friendly at Wembley, there will be another storyline in addition to the outcome of the football game. For England caretaker manager Gareth Southgate, this is the final match of his four-game trial. But he will face off against Spain manager Julen Lopetegui - whose rise from coach of the Under-21s to taking charge of the national team he hopes to emulate. 

LIFE

Who's the killer? Please vote

In whodunnit mystery Body X - The Rehearsal, viewers choose which actor to follow around during the two-hour Mandarin theatre adventure. They then gather to vote on which character is most likely to be the murderer.

The truth will be revealed only after the show's run. 

LIFE

A vision of American dystopia

The election of Mr Donald Trump as US president has turned what author Lionel Shriver intended as a work of speculative dystopia into "historical fiction". Her latest novel, The Mandibles: A Family, 2029-2047, imagines an economic apocalypse for the United States in the near future. She says this vision has now become more tangible.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on November 15, 2016, with the headline 'What's News'. Print Edition | Subscribe