Violent content on social media

Muhammad Wanndy's Facebook page was open to the public but later deactivated.
Muhammad Wanndy's Facebook page was open to the public but later deactivated.PHOTO: REUTERS

PETALING JAYA • Muhammad Wanndy Mohamed Jedi holds up the severed head of a man with a smile, one finger pointing upwards. The photo posted on Facebook on April 14 was blocked by the social media network, but Muhammad Wanndy calls it "the most beautiful picture I ever had".

The post was not unique on his Facebook page, which had more than a few shots of severed heads, and serves to underline the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) operative's lust for violence.

Using the assumed name Abu Hamzah Al-Fateh on Facebook, Muhammad Wanndy is probably the most high-profile Malaysian fighting for ISIS in Syria. His Facebook page was open to the public but later deactivated.

The man whose head he held was referred to in his post as a "dog" of the Kurdistan Workers' Party. Many posted comments praising him, but one questioned the difference between Muhammad Wanndy and his victim.

He responded that it was a lesson for those who go against Islam. "They are dead because they attacked Daulah Islamiyyah," he said, referring to the religion.

On March 25, he said he was excited about a battle in Raqqa. Many posts touch on religion and martyrdom.

He also praised two bombers who attacked a nightclub in Malaysia last June 28, saying their "good deeds" would be rewarded.

A video shows him assembling a machine gun, with a child next to him, believed to be his daughter. One post shows her holding a rifle, with him saying: "Arra want to go to war... She wants to become a mujahideen."

THE STAR/ASIA NEWS NETWORK

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on April 27, 2017, with the headline 'Violent content on social media'. Print Edition | Subscribe